If you suspect an overdose, call 911 right away.

Stay safer.

 Find out how you can stay safer when using drugs.

Toxic drugs

are circulating.

The illegal drug supply in BC is more toxic and unpredictable than ever. People are losing their loved ones every single day—family, friends, neighbours, co-workers. But toxic drug injuries and deaths can be prevented.

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BUDDY UP

Try not to use alone. If you don’t have someone to use with, head to a supervised consumption site, or use the Lifeguard app.

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START LOW, GO SLOW

Test a small amount of the substance first, and go slowly, especially if you haven’t used in a while. If you are in a group, make sure at least one person stays sober until you have confirmed that your batch is safe.

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TEST YOUR DRUGS

Visit a drug checking site to get your drugs tested.

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CARRY A KIT

Carry naloxone and know how to use it. Call 9-1-1 if someone needs help.

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USE THE APP

Download and use the Lifeguard app (from Apple App Store or Google Play Store). This life-saving app connects you to emergency responders if you become unresponsive.

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TALK ABOUT IT

Call 8-1-1 to find out how to access harm reduction services and supplies, and treatment and recovery options.

About

Naloxone.

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image of naloxone kit

Naloxone is a medication that can reverse opioid overdose temporarily. You can get a naloxone kit to carry with you—find out where to get one here.

Always call 9-1-1 for help. Naloxone cannot reverse an overdose from non-opioid drugs like benzos. It can be hard to know what someone has taken, especially since street drugs are often cut with other substances. ​​​​​​ If you are unsure what someone has taken, you can still use naloxone. It will not harm them.

Know your rights.

If you are at the scene of an overdose and you or someone else calls 9-1-1 to get medical assistance, you are not to be charged with simple possession (possession for your own personal use) of an illegal substance. 

You are also not to be charged for breach of probation or parole relating to simple drug possession.

Learn more about the Good Samaritan Act

Get help.

For yourself, a loved one, or a friend who may need help.